LIVING WELLNESS

Kitchen Essentials

October 11, 2013
health-2

It’s been a long week, and I’m glad it’s finally the weekend. I can’t wait to spend a weekend in London, with this cozy Autumnal weather, long walks, baking, cooking, juicing (and evening trips to our local pub with friends, of course). Here comes my second series of my Kitchen Essentials… Which are also the perfect supplements and remedies for this Autumnal weather!


MANUKA HONEY

Manuka honey – I call it a ‘healing remedy’. Originating from New Zealand, it’s known since the ancient times for treating multiple conditions, with its natural antibacterial qualities. It also increases the production of your cells, to repair tissue by infection; as well as having an anti-inflammatory action that can quickly reduce pain and inflammation once it is applied.

Other benefits?

– Reduces high cholesterol

– Reduces systemic inflammation

– Treats diabetes

– Treats eye, ear, and sinus infections

– Treats gastrointestinal problems

– Treats sore through and bad colds.

Other than that, it’s super yummy in hot tea with lemon (really helps for sore throats), in my morning smoothies, porridge, and lightly spread on buckwheat crackers. YUM! You might have also noticed it says 12+ on the tub? Well basically, the higher the number, the more potent the honey and its powers (it is reccomended to have 10 or higher for the honey to be properly effective) – which also means the more expensive the tub.

Manuka Pharm 12+ from Holland & Barrett, £12.99.


WHEATGRASS POWDER

Yes, granted this is basically grass (and tastes rather grassy) – it is the perfect supplement in my green juices (some people have it in their cereal – which I do not understand). In the juices, you can hardly taste it! Be careful with the amount though, it might upset your tummy with too much; I normally have one spoonful.

So, what is wheatgrass? Well, wheatgrass is a natural source of vitamins and antioxidants, including vitamins A, E, and B-12, calcium, selenium, magnesium & iron (!).

Other benefits?

– One ounce of wheatgrass juice is equivalent to the vitamin and mineral content of one ounce of fresh vegetables.

– Wheatgrass juice contains up to 70% chlorophyll, which is an important blood builder.

– Chlorophyll cleanses and neutralizes toxins in the body.

– Chlorophyll helps purify the liver.

– Wheatgrass contains a full spectrum of vitamins and minerals, including the thirteen essential ones, combined with dozens of trace elements and enzymes.

– Gargle wheatgrass juice for a sore throat (this one was new to me!)

– Wheatgrass juice improves the digestion.

– Wheatgrass juice is an excellent skin cleanser!

And these are only a few of the many benefits! Needless to say – both of these have incredible beneficiary properties, making them long standing essentials in my kitchen cupboard. More essentials to come soon!

Naturya Wheatgrass, from Amazon, £7.99.

health

 

Previous Post Next Post

You Might Also Like

3 Comments

  • Reply Louba October 11, 2013 at 11:37

    Hey Anneli, you’re absolutely right about the health benefits of Manuka, and as you say the potency of Manuka is rated by the UMF rating. However, the honey you have pictured here is not a UMF. If its certified UMF, it should say on the jar/ company website. The jar you hav here does have some kind of rating but its different to the UMF rating. I only know this because Ive made this mistake myself- buying Manuka honey wehich says 10 or 12 on the tub then only to realise that it isnt a UMF rating. You’ll probably find its a rating the company have created for the product but its not the same as UMF. Thats not to say the one you’ve brought isnt a good honey but when you’re buying you want to shop for one which says UMF on the jar then you know for certain. Hope that makes sense!xx

    • Reply Louba October 11, 2013 at 11:42

      Check this for more info xx http://www.umf.org.nz/uk/consumer

    • Reply AnneliWIBT October 11, 2013 at 12:33

      Hi Louba,

      Thank you so much for your comment and enlightening me on this! It must be a pretty common mistake – have amended the article :)

      Best wishes,
      Anneli

    Leave a Reply